Resource Library

IGEN and our partners are developing and collecting resources to support individuals and institutions that are interested in equity and inclusion in graduate education.

Type
Audience
  • Presentation Materials

    Learning across disciplines: Addressing teacher recruitment, career development, and graduate student diversity through partnerships

    Jodi Wesemann, Joerg Schlatterer, Corrie Kuniyoshi, Terri Chambers
    Details
    Presented at
    Gordon Research Conference-CERP 2019
    , 2019-06

    Research and reports about transforming undergraduate STEM education highlight the need to implement research-based practices and to learn from that process, expanding the research base.

  • Presentation Materials

    APS Bridge Program: Erasing Achievement Gap in Doctoral Education

    Theodore Hodapp
    Details
    Presented at
    TPSE Math: Partner Meeting
    , 2019-04

    Presentation on how the APS Bridge program works to decrease the achievement gap in doctoral education for underrepresented minority students in Physics degrees.   

  • Presentation Materials

    Graduate Admissions Practice on Diversity and Inclusion Workshop

    Julie R. Posselt, Casey W. Miller
    Details
    Presented at
    Graduate Admissions Practice on Diversity and Inclusion Workshop
    , 2019-03

    Presentation on the efforts to increase diversity in graduate education, and providing practical strategies for doing so by rethinking typical recruitment and admission processes. Including how common admissions mindsets and practices inhibit access for underrepresented groups, and concrete strategies to change admission processes to yield improved diversity and equity.

  • Presentation Materials

    NSF INCLUDES Journey to an Alliance Webinars – California Regional Collaborative

    David Gruber, Jan Taylor, Cindy Ziker, Theodore Hodapp, Cathy Mader, Ann Gates, Andrea Tirres, Kacy Redd
    Details
    Presented at
    NSF INCLUDES Journey to an Alliance Webinars
    , 2019-03

    Presentation on IGEN at NSF Includes: Journey to an Alliance webinar, a series designed to introduce the network to the NSF INCLUDES Alliances and learn about the successes, challenges and lessons learned about launching their partnerships and backbone organizations. 

  • Presentation Materials

    Optimizing Your Mentoring Relationships: Building a Mentoring Network

    Melissa McDaniel
    Details
    Presented at
    BU Office of Research
    , 2019-03

    Workshop presentation by Dr. Melissa McDaniels from Michigan State University, graduate student and postdoctoral participants will be urged to think about the proactive roles they can play in ‘mentoring up’ – strategically and authentically negotiating their constellation of mentoring relationships. Using this lens, participants will be brought through a series of guided conversations and exercises to help them thing about how they might ‘map’ their mentoring networks, anchored by professional competencies, to empower themselves to optimize all mentoring relationships.

  • Presentation Materials

    INCLUDES Alliance: The Inclusive Graduate Education Network

    Theodore Hodapp
    Details
    Presented at
    APS-Bridge Program and National Mentoring Community Conference
    , 2018-11

    Presentation on project goals and activities of the NSF INCLUDES Alliance grant awarded to the Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN). 

  • Presentation Materials

    Having Culturally Sensitive Mentoring Conversations: Faculty Session

    Steven Lee, Christine Pfund
    Details
    Presented at
    APS-Bridge Program and National Mentoring Community Conference
    , 2018-11

    High quality mentoring is an important predictor of persistence for researchers pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields and can influence the confidence of historically underrepresented trainees' ability to successfully conduct research. Despite this, mentors typically do not receive any training on how to optimize their mentoring relationships. Stories from student mentees from historically underrepresented backgrounds will be shared to learn from their perspectives. Mentors will learn new approaches from each other as they work through mentoring challenges, reflect upon their mentoring experiences, and refine their individual approaches to mentoring. Workshop leaders will provide concrete tools and strategies mentors can incorporate into their practice and extrapolate to their own context. Participants are expected to gain confidence in proactively working with students from diverse backgrounds. See Key Strategies for Mentoring Parts I and II.

  • Presentation Materials

    Optimizing Your Mentoring Relationship Roundtable | Tufts University - Graduate Programs

    Melissa McDaniel
    Details
    Presented at
    Optimizing Your Mentoring Relationship Roundtable
    , 2018-11

    Discussion with faculty and staff, touching on various aspects of the mentoring experience, including work-life balance concerns. The focus is on discussing the mentoring relationship in graduate school, building mentoring relationships, and supporting students' growth. 

  • Presentation Materials

    Key Strategies for Mentoring: Part 2

    Christine Pfund, Steven Lee
    Details
    Presented at
    APS-Bridge Program and National Mentoring Community Conference
    , 2018-11

    Workshop Presentation: High quality mentoring is an important predictor of persistence for researchers pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields and can influence the confidence of historically underrepresented trainees’ ability to successfully conduct research. Despite this, mentors typically do not receive any training on how to optimize their mentoring relationships. In this interactive workshop, mentors will engage in case studies, activities and small-group discussions aimed to accelerate the acquisition of the mentoring skills and insights needed to cultivate effective mentee-mentor relationships. In part II of this interactive workshop, mentors will discuss the challenges of accurately assessing understanding and providing constructive feedback. Mentors will also discuss ways to foster mentee independence and build their research self-efficacy. Through the workshop, participating mentors will learn new approaches from each other as they work through mentoring challenges, reflect upon their mentoring experiences, and refine their individual approaches to mentoring. Workshop leaders will provide concrete tools and strategies mentors can incorporate into their practice and extrapolate to their own context. Through this process, participants are expected to gain confidence in proactively working with students from diverse backgrounds.

  • Presentation Materials

    Key Strategies for Mentoring: Part I

    Christine Pfund, Steven Lee
    Details
    Presented at
    APS-Bridge Program and National Mentoring Community Conference
    , 2018-11

    Worksop Presentation: High quality mentoring is an important predictor of persistence for researchers pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields and can influence the confidence of historically underrepresented trainees' ability to successfully conduct research. Despite this, mentors typically do not receive any training on how to optimize their mentoring relationships. In this interactive workshop, mentors will engage in case studies, activities and small-group discussions aimed to accelerate the acquisition of the mentoring skills and insights needed to cultivate effective mentee-mentor relationships. In part I of this interactive workshop, mentors will discuss the challenges of misaligned expectations and explore the use of mentoring compacts to convey expectations in a transparent and equitable manner. Mentors will also complete a communication style inventory and explore ways to optimize communication in their mentoring relationships. Through the workshop, participating mentors will learn new approaches from each other as they work through mentoring challenges, reflect upon their mentoring experiences, and refine their individual approaches to mentoring. Workshop leaders will provide concrete tools and strategies mentors can incorporate into their practice and extrapolate to their own context. Through this process, participants are expected to gain confidence in proactively working with students from diverse backgrounds.

  • Presentation Materials

    Culturally Aware Mentoring

    Christine Pfund, Brian Zamarripa Roman, Michelle Lollie, Mike Lopez, Wendy Mendoza
    Details
    Presented at
    APS-Bridge Program and National Mentoring Community Conference
    , 2018-11

    Mentoring is an important factor in the satisfaction, productivity and persistence of mentees across disciplines yet research shows that the landscape of mentoring is unequal. Mentees from traditionally underrepresented groups (UG) report less access to mentoring and rate the mentoring they do receive lower in quality. Moreover, mentees from UGs more frequently report feeling a sense of isolation in their research environments and pressure to hide their cultural identities while at work. Mentors of these diverse mentees report uncertainty about if and how to broach topics of belonging, diversity and inclusion in their mentoring relationships. In this plenary session, we will explore the concept of culturally aware mentoring. Following a brief introductory presentation, four mentees will share insights gained from their lived experience; how they are navigating their science and cultural identities and how mentoring has played a role in their educational path. Each panelist will address the following questions: •What has worked for you in your mentoring relationship overall? •What did not work so well? •Around the topic of culturally aware mentoring: Have you been able to share salient aspects of cultural identity (-ies) with your mentor and/or your research team members? Why or why not? •What approaches have mentors used to demonstrate their support of you and all of your identities? How have they or could they demonstrate their cultural awareness in this regard?

  • Article

    ACS part of new alliance to bolster underrepresented students in physical sciences

    Joan Coyle
    Details
    Published in ACS News, 2018-09

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) is one of five leading scientific societies that have formed the Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN) to increase the participation of women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities in graduate studies in the physical sciences.

  • Article

    Task force recommends US$50-million fund to bring African Americans into physics and astronomy

    Virginia Gewin
    Details
    Published in Nature, 2020-01

    The American Institute of Physics aims to double the number of black undergraduates in the field.

  • Article

    The 2019 IGEN National Meeting: Connecting the Threads of Graduate Education and Inclusion

    Brián Clash
    Details
    Published in APS News Volume 28, Number 11, 2019-12

    Conference brings together champions of diversity and inclusion to increase the number of under-represented minority students earning PhDs.

  • Journal Article

    A Closer Look at Diversity: Understanding the Place of Race Post-Affirmative Action

    Kristen M. Glasener
    Details
    Published in APA Journal, 2019-04

    This article examines the ways diversity is framed at schools with race-neutral admissions policies.

    © 2019 American Psychological Association

  • Recording

    The Meritocracy Myth of College Admissions

    Julie R. Posselt
    Details
    Published in WORT 89.9 FM, 2019-03

    In March of 2019, William Rick Singer plead guilty to federal conspiracy, bribery and obstruction of justice charges for his work as an academic admissions “fixer.” Following an FBI sting, Singer admitted to bribing college admissions staff, getting ringers to take ACT and SAT tests, and fabricating athletic resumes, all on behalf of the offspring …

    2019 Back Porch Broadcasting, Inc.

  • Journal Article

    Bridge to success and inclusivity

    Roy Clarke, Çagliyan Kurdak
    Details
    Published in MRS Bulletin, Volume 44, Issue 2, 2019-02

     

    The American Physical Society’s Bridge Program increases the output of doctorates awarded to underrepresented graduate students in the physical sciences.

  • Article

    The GRE fails to identify students that will graduate and hurts diversity, new study finds RIT researchers say the GRE doesn’t predict student success as effectively as presumed

    Lake Auburn
    Details
    Published in RIT | NEWS, 2019-01

    A team of researchers led by Rochester Institute of Technology Professor and Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Casey Miller completed a multivariate statistical analysis of about one in eight physics Ph.D. students from 2000 to 2010.  They discovered that while women and underrepresented minorities tend to perform worse on the GRE Physics Subject Test, students’ performance had no bearing on Ph.D. completion. Undergraduate GPA was the most robust predictor of Ph.D. completion they found. 

     

  • Article

    East Coast Holistic Review Institute a Success

    Details
    Published in The Graduate School, University of Maryland, 2019-01

    The University of Maryland's Graduate School hosted the first-ever East Coast Holistic Review Institute (HRI).  Led by Drs. Julie Posselt and Casey Miller...Holistic review aims to improve the diversity of graduate student populations and to help ensure that those who enroll stay in their programs and succeed. 

  • Article

    US graduate entry exams not a predictor of PhD success, says study

    Michael Allen
    Details
    Published in Physics World, Copyright Institute of Physics (the “Institute”) and IOP Publishing 2009, 2019-01

    Exams that US students need to take before being allowed into graduate school are not a reliable way of assessing whether those candidates will successfully complete a PhD. That is the claim of new research, which shows that the over-reliance on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) in PhD admissions also discriminates against under-represented groups. The study has been carried out by a team led by Casey Miller — a physicist from the Rochester Institute of Technology — who analysed data for almost 4000 students who entered physics PhD programmes between 2000 and 2010, representing around 13% of doctoral enrolments during that period.

  • Article

    The GRE Fails to Identify Students that will Graduate and Hurts Diversity, New Study Finds

    PR Newswire
    Details
    Published in Markets Insider, 2019-01

    Researchers are urging universities across the United States to find a new way to identify the next generation of scientists. A new study discovered that traditional admissions metrics for physics Ph.D. programs such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) do not predict completion and hurt the growth of diversity in physics, which is already the least diverse of the sciences.

  • Article

    ACS receives $2.3 million grant to help make graduate education more inclusive

    Linda Wang
    Details
    Published in C&EN vol 96 issue 42, 2018-10

    The American Chemical Society has been awarded a $2.3 million grant over five years from the National Science Foundation as part of an alliance of scientific societies to increase the participation of women and underrepresented minorities in graduate education in the physical sciences. The Inclusive Graduate Education Network is a five-year, $10 million grant led by the American Physical Society (APS). 

  • Article

    IGEN Takes the APS Bridge Program to the Next Level

    Leah Poffenberger
    Details
    Published in APS News vol 27 issue 9, 2018-10

    APS has joined forces with four other scientific societies—the American Chemical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Astronomical Society, and the Materials Research Society—to increase participation of underrepresented students in graduate physical science programs. The five societies make up the Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN) that will be funded with a five-year $10 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

  • Article

    RIT wins collaborative NSF award to improve STEM ecosystem

    Susan Gawlowicz
    Details
    Published in EurekAlert!, 2018-09

    Rochester Institute of Technology is helping to build a national network for improving access to graduate education for underrepresented students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

  • Article

    APS Helps Form the Inclusive Graduate Education Network

    Leah Poffenberger
    Details
    Published in APS News, 2018-09

    APS has joined forces with four other scientific societies—the American Chemical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Astronomical Society, and the Materials Research Society—to increase participation of underrepresented students in graduate physical science programs. The five societies make up the Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN) that will be funded with a five-year $10M grant from the National Science Foundation.

  • Article

    NSF INCLUDES takes major step forward with new awards | NSF - National Science Foundation

    National Science Foundation (NSF)
    Details
    Published in NSF News Release, 2018-09

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) has issued new awards that represent the next major step for its NSF INCLUDES program -- the development of a national network to enhance U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by broadening participation in those disciplines.

  • Article

    Catherine Mader Working with National Effort to Bolster Underrepresented Students in Physical Sciences Graduate Programs

    Greg Olgers
    Details
    Published in Hope College Campus News, 2018-09

    Dr. Catherine Mader of the Hope College physics faculty is part of a collaboration led by the American Physical Society (APS) that has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to create and administer a nationwide, five-year effort that seeks to increase participation in careers in the physical sciences by women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities by helping more pursue graduate education.

  • Presentation Materials

    Creating Safe and Inclusive Field Experiences: Responding to Bullying and Harassment

    Erika Marin-Spiotta, Meredith Hastings, Asmeret Asefaw Berhe
    Details
    Presented at
    Building Strong Departments Developing Pathways for Strong Programs for the Future
    , 2019-12

    Field research and training create unique environments that can both reinforce and make invisible existing power dynamics, with the potential for abuse. In this interactive session we will discuss and practice strategies to reduce the likelihood of abusive behaviors such as bullying and harassment as well as how to respond when they do occur, with a focus on field environments. For more information visit the ADVANCEGeo resources on field work.

  • Presentation Materials

    Identifying barriers to ethnic/racial minority students’ participation in graduate physics

    Geraldine L. Cochran, Theodore Hodapp, and Erika E. Alexander Brown
    Details
    Published in Physics Education Research Conference 2017, 2017-07

    Abstract

    Historically, access to education in the U.S. has not been equitable. Furthermore, intersectionality, the interaction of multiple identities, results in educational experiences that vary widely for diverse groups of students with implications for the recruitment of future students. To better understand barriers to ethnic/racial minority students participating in graduate education a study has been conducted through the APS Bridge program, a program designed to increase the number of ethnic/racial minorities earning PhDs in physics. In phase one of this study, we analyzed student responses to an application question regarding why they chose not to apply to graduate physics programs. To further understand the barriers identified in the first phase of this study, we interviewed nine participants in the 2016 Cohort of the APS Bridge program. The results of this study have implications for a variety of stakeholders interested in broadening participation in graduate physics education.

  • Article

    It's Time for the Talk: Opinion

    Julie R. Posselt and Casey W. Miller
    Details
    Published in Inside Higher Ed, 2018-05

    Topic

    Graduate programs, not just undergraduate colleges, need to think about whether they need standardized admissions tests and whether they are using them in appropriate ways.

  • Journal Article

    Trust Networks: A New Perspective on Pedigree and the Ambiguities of Admissions

    Julie R. Posselt
    Details
    Published in The Review of Higher Education, Volume 41, Number 4, Summer 2018, pp. 497-521,

    Abstract

    Privileging elite academic pedigrees in graduate admissions preserves racial and socioeconomic inequities that many institutions say they wish to reduce. To understand this preference, I integrate across perspectives on trust in rational choice, social capital, and social network theories, and use the resulting framework to interpret 68 interviews with faculty reflecting on graduate admissions. Individual and institutional trust networks enable faculty to invest in students' uncertain futures, with trust especially important for interpretations of transcripts and letters of recommendation. I discuss trust networks' consequences for admissions, how they can be expanded, and their relevance for future higher education research.

     

  • Journal Article

    Burdens and benefits of diversity work: emotion management in STEM doctoral students

    Kamaria B. Porter, Julie R. Posselt, Kimberly Reyes, Kelly E. Slay and Aurora Kamimura
    Details
    Published in Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, Volume 9, Issue 2, 2018-11

    Abstract

     

    Purpose

    As part of the broader effort to diversify higher education in the USA, many science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) doctoral programs are deeply engaged in diversity work – an array of formal activities and practices meant to boost the representation of women and students of color. This paper aims to examine how underrepresented doctoral students in high-diversity STEM PhD programs contribute to diversity work in their programs.

     

    Design/methodology/approach

    A case study approach was used to understand the nature of diversity work in four STEM doctoral programs that have enrolled and graduated women and/or underrepresented students of color at rates significantly higher than their disciplines, despite being located in states with affirmative action bans. This study analyzes qualitative data from 24 semi-structured interviews and four focus groups with students from across the four departments.

     

    Findings

    Data reveal that underrepresented students are simultaneously positioned as representatives of progress and uncompensated consultants in their departments’ ongoing equity and diversity efforts. As a result, student contributions to diversity work are experienced as an ongoing process of emotional labor in which institutional ethos and/or feeling rules in the department shape how students manage their internal and external emotions.

     

    Originality/value

    Although diversity-related work is widespread and growing within colleges and universities, this study shows how student engagement in diversification efforts can lead to significant emotional burdens that go unnoticed and uncompensated. In highlighting the invisibility of emotional labor and the skew of its distribution toward minoritized groups, this research calls attention to how tacit feeling rules can undermine the ultimate goal of diversity initiatives within graduate departments and programs.

     

  • Journal Article

    Metrics First, Diversity Later? Making the Short List and Getting Admitted to Physics PhD Programs

    Julie R. Posselt, Theresa E. Hernandez, Geraldine L. Cochran and Casey W. Miller
    Details
    Published in Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Volume 25, 2019 Issue 4,

    Abstract

    Recent research suggests that faculty reliance on graduate record examination (GRE) scores early in the graduate admissions review disproportionately limits access to doctoral education for women, Black, Latinx, and Native American students. However, some faculty do engage in more holistic review−and in so doing, weigh diversity−when evaluating applicants on a short list. This paper has three objectives: to test the prevalence of this two-stage review process; to examine whether the factors associated with an applicant's selection to a short list differ from those associated with receiving an admission offer; and third, to assess implications of admissions preferences for equitable access. We conducted fixed-effects logistic regression using application-level data from six large, selective physics programs who participated in a project piloting means to increase diversity in physics. We found that faculty in these programs indeed placed a premium on standard evaluation metrics in the first round of review. Women are more likely than men to both make the short list and be admitted, whereas Black and Latinx applicants do not have significantly higher odds than white students of moving forward in the admissions process, all else equal. Our findings add weight to a rising tide of evidence that faculty must revisit the narrow framing they have traditionally used in the admissions process to increase diversity in their graduate programs.

     

  • Journal Article

    Bait and Switch: Representation, Climate, and Tensions of Diversity Work in Graduate Education

    Kelly E. Slay, Kimberly A. Reyes and Julie R. Posselt
    Details
    Published in The Review of Higher Education, Special Issue 2019, Vol. 42, Supplement, pp. 255-286,

    Abstract

    We present findings from a case study of a psychology department that has graduated a significantly higher share of underrepresented doctoral students than national averages for its discipline. Using the campus racial climate framework, we found that organizational/structural diversity initiatives (recruitment and admissions practices), presented a positive image of the department's commitment to diversity to prospective students that diverged considerably from the climate and mentoring relationships students experienced once they matriculated. We compared this to a "bait and switch" phenomenon and considered the consequences for students' success and wellbeing, as well as the ability to sustain diverse student enrollment.

     

  • Journal Article

    Typical physics Ph.D. admissions criteria limit access to underrepresented groups but fail to predict doctoral completion

    Casey W. Miller, Benjamin M. Zwickl, Julie R. Posselt, Rachel T. Silvestrini and Theodore Hodapp
    Details
    Published in Science Advances Vol. 5 No. 1, 2019-01

    Abstract

    This study aims to understand the effectiveness of typical admissions criteria in identifying students who will complete the Physics Ph.D. Multivariate statistical analysis of roughly one in eight physics Ph.D. students from 2000 to 2010 indicates that the traditional admissions metrics of undergraduate grade point average (GPA) and the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Quantitative, Verbal, and Physics Subject Tests do not predict completion as effectively admissions committees presume. Significant associations with completion were found for undergraduate GPA in all models and for GRE Quantitative in two of four studied models; GRE Physics and GRE Verbal were not significant in any model. It is notable that completion changed by less than 10% for U.S. physics major test takers scoring in the 10th versus 90th percentile on the Quantitative test. Aside from these limitations in predicting Ph.D. completion overall, overreliance on GRE scores in admissions processes also selects against underrepresented groups.

     

  • Journal Article

    Incidental Racialization: Performative Assimilation in Law School by Yung-Yi Diana Pan

    Julie R. Posselt
    Details
    Published in American Journal of Sociology Volume 124, Number 5, 2019-03

    Abstract

    A third of U.S. college graduates go on to graduate or professional education of some sort, with 9% of Americans earning a master's degree or higher and 0.5% becoming lawyers. For this reason and others, studies of becoming a lawyer contribute to our knowledge of elite formation. As with most ad­vanced education, socialization is central to learning in law school, and it has been documented extensively. One not only learns the law in the three years it takes to earn a juris doctorate. That person also comes to love the law, live by the law, and think like a lawyer. And although we know some­thing about the gender and class dynamks of socialization to the legal pro­fession, until now evidence has been sparse about em bedded racialization in what "becoming a lawyer" means. In Incidental Racialization: Performative Assimilation in Law School, Yung-Yi Diana Pan uses the experience of Latinos and Asian Americans becoming lawyers as a window into these processes, as well as others of in­terest to stratification scholars: ethnoracial formation, assimilation, and the reproduction of inequality to name three. The focus on Latino and Asian American students is fresh, opening space for the analysis of immigrant ex­periences and identities within the book's broader task of understanding racialization within a particular professional context. Indeed, the experiences of these"new" immigrant groups are what racializes identity formation in law school. Professions serve as a key mechanism for integration of Asian Amer­icans (who may be subject to model minority stereotypes) and Latinos (who may be subject to stereotypes about legal status) into society's economic mainstream. 

     

  • Journal Article

    Advancing inclusion in the Geosciences: An overview of the NSF-GOLD program

    Julie R. Posselt, Jason Andrew Chen, P. Grady Dixon and Jerlando F. L. Jackson
    Details
    Published in Journal of Geoscience Education, 2019-09

    Abstract

    Here we report on five pilot projects working to develop effective professional development aimed at improving diversity, equity, and inclusion within the geosciences. All five projects were funded by the NSF GEO Opportunities for Leadership in Diversity (GOLD) program, which was designed to bring together geoscientists and social scientists to create innovative pilot programs for preparing and empowering geoscientists as change agents for increasing diversity. Each project has different objectives and applies different combinations of methods, but focuses on professional development, bystander intervention training, and the formation of new networks in the pursuit of systemic, institutional change. This article describes the origins, aims, and activities of these projects, and reflects on lessons learned to date. These projects are still ongoing, but in their first two years they have received more interest than anticipated and more demand than can be fulfilled, suggesting an unserved need in the field. We have also found that teams with varied backgrounds, experiences, and expertise are vital to overcoming common struggles in facing inequalities. Coaching from experts in diversity, equity, and inclusion keeps the teams motivated, particularly when many team members are accustomed to typical scientific research. Finally, institutional change requires time to catalyze, develop, and institutionalize, highlighting the importance of sustained effort over years.

     

  • Report

    The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM

    National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Policy and Global Affairs; Board on Higher Education and Workforce; Committee on Effective Mentoring in STEMM; Angela Byars-Winston and Maria Lund Dahlberg, Editors
    Details
    Published in National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Consensus Study Report, 2019-10

    Abstract

    Mentorship is a catalyst capable of unleashing one's potential for discovery, curiosity, and participation in STEMM and subsequently improving the training environment in which that STEMM potential is fostered. Mentoring relationships provide developmental spaces in which students' STEMM skills are honed and pathways into STEMM fields can be discovered. Because mentorship can be so influential in shaping the future STEMM workforce, its occurrence should not be left to chance or idiosyncratic implementation. There is a gap between what we know about effective mentoring and how it is practiced in higher education.

     

  • Journal Article

    PhD bridge programmes as engines for access, diversity and inclusion

    Alexander L. Rudolph, Kelly Holley-Bockelmann & Julie Posselt
    Details
    Published in Nature Astronomy, 2019-12

    Abstract

    The lack of diversity in physics and astronomy PhD programmes is well known but has not improved despite decades of efforts. PhD bridge programmes provide an asset-based model to help overcome the societal and disciplinary obstacles to improving access and inclusion for students from underrepresented groups and are beginning to show some success. We describe several well-known PhD bridge programmes in the United States and discuss lessons learned from their experiences. Many of these lessons can be extended more broadly to physics and astronomy PhD programmes to increase access, diversity and inclusion.

     

  • Journal Article

    Response to comment on “Typical physics Ph.D. admissions criteria limit access to underrepresented groups but fail to predict doctoral completion”

    Casey W. Miller, Benjamin M. Zwickl, Julie R. Posselt, Rachel T. Silvestrini and Theodore Hodapp
    Details
    Published in Science Advances Vol. 6 No. 23, 2020-06

    Abstract

    We provide statistical measures and additional analyses showing that our original analyses were sound. We use a generalized linear mixed model to account for program-to-program differences with program as a random effect without stratifying with tier and found the GRE-P (Graduate Record Examination physics test) effect is not different from our previous findings, thereby alleviating concern of collider bias. Variance inflation factors for each variable were low, showing that multicollinearity was not a concern. We show that range restriction is not an issue for GRE-P or GRE-V (GRE verbal), and only a minor issue for GRE-Q (GRE quantitative). Last, we use statistical measures of model quality to show that our published models are better than or equivalent to several alternates.

     

  • Blog Post

    Congratulations to @WestEd partners in the #NSFINCLUDES Alliance

    WestEd
    Details

    Congratulations to @WestEd partners in the #NSFINCLUDES Alliance: Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN) on new award! We are pleased to serve as lead evaluator in support of the Alliance & the @NSF commitment to #equity. http://ow.ly/FlNH30lIqae  @I

  • Blog Post

    #NSFINCLUDES Alliance: Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN) awarded $10M to boost opps for underrepresented students in grad physical science programs.

    WestEd
    Details

    #NSFINCLUDES Alliance: Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN) awarded $10M to boost opps for underrepresented students in grad physical science programs. WestEd is pleased to have served as lead evaluator in this major step forward. http://ow.ly/FlNH

  • Resources for supporting grad student wellbeing

    Details
    Published in 2019 IGEN National Meeting,

    Resources for supporting graduate student well-being

  • Presentation Materials

    Practicing Equitable Admissions through Holistic Review

    Julie R. Posselt
    Details
    Published in 2019 IGEN National Meeting, 2019-12 Presented at
    Heads and Chairs of Earth and Space Science Departments, AGU Fall Meeting
    , 2019-12

    This presentation will draw from a decade of research that 1) critically analyzes common systems of admission to doctoral programs and 2) develops a case for holistic review, including caveats about design and implementation. Dr. Posselt will present admissions from decision makers' point of view, including thought-provoking episodes of committees grappling with borderline cases. To promote equity, transparency, and legal safeguards, Posselt shares concrete strategies and places admissions within a system of practices that collectively shape student and program outcomes.

  • Presentation Materials

    Using Self-Efficacy to Address Imposter Syndrome

    Erika Brown
    Details
    Presented at
    2019 IGEN National Meeting
    , 2019-10

    What is Imposter Syndrome? What is self-efficacy? How can we build self-efficacy in ourselves AND others? 

    This presentation defines and articulates what self-efficacy is and its four sources, articulates your role in your own self-efficacy, identify signs of self-efficacy that resonate when conducting research/classroom related tasks, assess the influence of others on their research self-efficacy and devises strategies for supporting others’ self-efficacy in research.

  • Presentation Materials

    Minority Stress in Academia: Identifying and supporting students in distress

    Jennifer Crofts
  • Presentation Materials

    Balancing Wellness with Work, Life and Academics

    Sheri Waddill
  • Presentation Materials

    Creating a USEFUL Individual Development Plan

    Bill Lindstaedt
  • Presentation Materials

    A Crucial Conversation: Talking with your mentees about their future

    Bill Lindstaedt
  • Presentation Materials

    The Diversity Umbrella: What is Underneath it?

    Geraldine Cochran