Resource Library

IGEN and our partners are developing and collecting resources to support individuals and institutions that are interested in equity and inclusion in graduate education.

Type
Audience
  • Recording

    The Science of Mentorship

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
    Details
    The Science of Mentorship: A STEMM Podcast

    SUMMARY

     

    In this series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, you’ll hear personal stories about mentorship experiences from STEMM leaders, in their own words, to help you learn how evidence-based mentorship practices can help you develop the skills to engage in the most effective mentoring relationships possible.

     

    SHOW NOTES

     

    Welcome to The Science of Mentorship, a 10-episode podcast from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that introduces you to the evidence-based practices for effective mentoring told through the personal stories of leaders in science, tech, math, engineering, and medicine.

    You'll hear from notables like iconic physicist Dr. Jim Gates, groundbreaking physician Dr. Vivian Pinn, advocate mathematician Dr. Richard Tapia, and Twitter phenom immunobiologist Dr. Akiko Iwasaki. They share the ups and downs of their own mentorship journeys from the beginning of their careers to today, to help you develop the skills to engage in the most effective STEMM mentoring relationships possible.
    Mentorship is essential to the development of anyone in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, or medicine.

    If you are a mentor, a mentee, or have a role in mentorship, this podcast is for you. Listen to The Science of Mentorship to learn, practice, and optimize mentorship for you and your colleagues, and visit https://nas.edu/mentoring for more.

     

    WHAT IS THE SCIENCE OF MENTORSHIP?

     

    Mentorship is essential to the development of anyone in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, or medicine, but did you know mentorship is a set of skills that can be learned, practiced, and optimized?

    In this 10-part series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, you’ll hear the personal mentorship stories of leaders in academia, business, and the media, in their own words. Learn how evidence-based mentorship practices can help you develop the skills to engage in the most effective STEMM mentoring relationships possible.

    If you are a mentor, a mentee, or have a role in mentorship, this podcast is for you.

     

  • Guide

    Better Letters: Equitable Practices

    IGEN Research Hub
    Details
    Better Letters Cover Image Published in Equity in Graduate Education - University of Southern California, 2020-11

    When graduate admissions committees meet to review applicant files, letters of recommendation are one component of the holistic review process that provides information about the applicant’s previous work, personality, and potential for success as a doctoral student. In order to ensure that letters of recommendation are effective tools for enhancing equity, we must critically assess how we write, read, and solicit letters of recommendation. This is especially important because numerous studies have demonstrated the presence of implicit biases in letters of recommendation (Dutt et al, 2016; Madera et al., 2019; Trix & Psenka, 2003). The presence of these biases in letters of recommendation can influence how prospective students are evaluated by admission committees and therefore may produce and reproduce racial and gender inequality in doctoral education.

     

  • Article

    The Asterisk Year: Grades, Admissions, and Equity in a Pandemic

    Marissa Aivazis
    Details
    Asterisk Year Photo Published in Pullias Voices - Pullias Center for Higher Education, 2020-10

    "Julie Posselt, Theresa Hernandez, Deborah Southern, and Steve Desir from the Pullias Center and Fatima Alleyne from University of California, Berkeley, share their collective perspective on a year that continues to defy description."

  • Website

    The Death and Life of an Admissions Algorithm

    Lilah Burke
    Details
    University of Texas at Austin Published in Inside Higher Ed, 2020-12

    In 2013, the University of Texas at Austin’s computer science department began using a machine-learning system called GRADE to help make decisions about who gets into its Ph.D. program -- and who doesn’t. This year, the department abandoned it.

     

    Before the announcement, which the department released in the form of a tweet reply, few had even heard of the program. Now, its critics -- concerned about diversity, equity and fairness in admissions -- say it should never have been used in the first place.

     

    “Humans code these systems. Humans are encoding their own biases into these algorithms,” said Yasmeen Musthafa, a Ph.D. student in plasma physics at the University of California, Irvine, who rang alarm bells about the system on Twitter. “What would UT Austin CS department have looked like without GRADE? We’ll never know.”

     

    GRADE (which stands for GRaduate ADmissions Evaluator) was created by a UT faculty member and UT graduate student in computer science, originally to help the graduate admissions committee in the department save time. GRADE predicts how likely the admissions committee is to approve an applicant and expresses that prediction as a numerical score out of five. The system also explains what factors most impacted its decision.

     

    The UT researchers who made GRADE trained it on a database of past admissions decisions. The system uses patterns from those decisions to calculate its scores for candidates.

     

    For example, letters of recommendation containing the words “best,” “award,” “research” or “Ph.D.” are predictive of admission -- and can lead to a higher score -- while letters containing the words “good,” “class,” “programming” or “technology” are predictive of rejection. A higher grade point average means an applicant is more likely to be accepted, as does the name of an elite college or university on the résumé. Within the system, institutions were encoded into the categories “elite,” “good” and “other,” based on a survey of UT computer science faculty.

     

    Every application GRADE scored during the seven years it was in use was still reviewed by at least one human committee member, UT Austin has said, but sometimes only one. Before GRADE, faculty members made multiple review passes over the pool. The system saved the committee time, according to its developers, by allowing faculty to focus on applicants on the cusp of admission or rejection and review applicants in descending order of quality...

     

    Read the complete article here

     

  • Presentation Materials

    Progress Overview: Disciplinary Societies

    IGEN
    Details
    Progress Overview: Disciplinary Societies

    This slide, taken from IGEN's Reverse Site Visit 2020 presentation, highlights individual disciplinary society's progress made in year 2 towards project goals.

    [RSV Presentation Part 2, slide 6]

  • Article

    US Geoscience programmes drop controversial admissions test

    Virginia Gewin
    Details
    Nature Article Photo Published in Nature, 2020-07

    Geoscience graduate programmes across the United States are increasingly dropping a controversial standardized test from their admissions requirements.

    The graduate record examinations (GRE), which was introduced in 1949, aims to measure verbal and quantitative reasoning, analytical writing and critical thinking. In recent years, academic researchers and others have criticized the test, claiming that it unfairly weeds out capable students and restricts the flow of women and people from minority ethnic groups into the sciences.

    Geosciences departments began to eliminate it as an admissions requirement last year. The trend, dubbed GeoGRExit, has gained impetus as programmes seek to maintain numbers of graduate applications in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. But the geosciences have trailed behind other scientific disciplines. So far, more than 300 biology and biomedical graduate programmes have dropped the test, according to a list maintained by Joshua Hall, director of graduate admissions for the biological and biomedical sciences programme at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    Some 62 US geosciences programmes no longer require applicants to submit GRE results, according to a database maintained by Sarah Ledford, an urban hydrologist at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Around half of those have dropped the requirement since 4 June, when the American Geophysical Union’s weekly news magazine, Eos, published an opinion piece calling for the test to be abandoned. It argued that eliminating the GRE could help to boost diversity in one of science’s most exclusive disciplines.

     

  • Journal Article

    The gender gap in science: How long until women are equally represented?

    Luke Holman, Devi Stuart-Fox, Cindy E. Hauser
    Details
    PLOS Logo Published in PLOS Biology, 2018-04

    In most fields of science, medicine, and technology research, men comprise more than half of the workforce, particularly at senior levels. Most previous work has concluded that the gender gap is smaller today than it was in the past, giving the impression that there will soon be equal numbers of men and women researchers and that current initiatives to recruit and retain more women are working adequately. Here, we used computational methods to determine the numbers of men and women authors listed on >10 million academic papers published since 2002, allowing us to precisely estimate the gender gap among researchers, as well as its rate of change, for most disciplines of science and medicine. We conclude that many research specialties (e.g., surgery, computer science, physics, and maths) will not reach gender parity this century, given present-day rates of increase in the number of women authors. Additionally, the gender gap varies greatly across countries, with Japan, Germany, and Switzerland having strikingly few women authors. Women were less often commissioned to write ‘invited’ papers, consistent with gender bias by journal editors, and were less often found in authorship positions usually associated with seniority (i.e., the last-listed or sole author). Our results support a need for further reforms to close the gender gap.

  • Website

    The GENDER GAP in Academic Publishing – A Visualization

    Errol Lloyd
    Details
    The GENDER GAP in Academic Publishing

    This visualization allows one to view the past, present, and (estimated) future gender ratio of authors on academic publications listed on PubMed. The four buttons at the top allow subsetting of the data by journal, research discipline, the author's country of affiliation, and position in the author list (where 'overall' includes all authors).

    • The lefthand plot shows the estimated author gender ratio for each subset of the data (e.g. a journal, or a scientific discipline) in a certain year. The year can be controlled via the slider. The gender ratio was estimated by fitting a curve to the data, as described in the accompanying paper.
    • Clicking on a data point in the left plot will bring up a curve showing our estimate of the past, present, and future gender ratio, as well as the author gender ratio and its 95% confidence limits (shown by the error bars, which can be toggled on or off).
    • Hovering the mouse cursor over a data point shows the sample size in terms of the number of men and women authors, and the number of papers.

     

    Associated publication

    This visualization accompanies an article published in PLoS Biology.

    Holman L, Stuart-Fox D, Hauser CE (2018) The gender gap in science: How long until women are equally represented? PLOS Biology 16(4): e2004956. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.2004956.

     

    Contacts

    The gender data were collected by Luke Holman from the School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne. This data visualisation was made by Errol Lloyd.

     

  • Presentation Materials

    Diversity in Graduate Mathematical Sciences

    Theodore Hodapp
    Details
    paraDIGMS-IMSI Conference Presented at
    paraDIGMS Fall Conference
    , 2020-11

    Theodore Hodapp, Director of the NSF INCLUDES: IGEN Project presents the hard facts which show the disparities of equity in graduate programs across STEM disciplines. Hodapp hares how IGEN and its disciplinary society parters and bridge program institutions are tackling this issue and making a difference in increasing equity in graduate STEM education through a bridge program model offered at partner institutions.

     

  • Report

    AAS Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion in Astronomy Graduate Education

    American Astronomical Society
    Details
    Generic PDF Icon

    Executive Summary

    At the January 2017 AAS meeting in Texas, the AAS Council (now the AAS Board of Trustees) approved the creation of a Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion in Astronomy Graduate Education. This document details the charge, goals, membership, structure, and activities of the task force.

    The Task Force held its first meeting in November 2017. At that first meeting, the Task Force members, to facilitate the work of the Task Force, approved the creation of three working groups. Each working group was co-chaired by two Task Force members who recruited additional members from the community. These working groups took primary responsibility for soliciting input from the community around their topic and developing the recommendations contained in this report. In addition, presentations were made to the four AAS Diversity committees (CSWA, CSMA, SGMA, and WGAD) by the Task Force liaisons from each committee to directly solicit their input and feedback. The committees were also given a chance to review this report in draft form to comment. All recommendations were discussed and approved by the entire Task Force. See Appendix II for details of the Task Force creation and timeline of activities.

    The Task Force’s list of detailed recommendations by category is summarized below. Details of each recommendation, and the justification behind it, including references from social science research supporting the recommendation, are found in the main report. Evidence-based resources and tools that will help in the implementation of the recommendations are included in the Appendices.

     

  • Report

    Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education: 2020 Supplement

    American Council on Educations
    Details
    ACH | Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education: 2020 Supplement

    This report examines over 150 indicators, looking at academic experiences and outcomes, and how these educational journeys differ, by race and ethnicity.

     

  • Article

    #GeoGRExit: Why Geosciences Programs Are Dropping the GRE

    Sarah H. Ledford, Minda M. Monteagudo, Alejandro N. Flores, Jennifer B. Glass, and Kim M. Cobb
    Details
    #GeoGRE Exit Photo Published in EOS, 2020-06

    "Geoscience graduate programs are increasingly abandoning the controversial test as an admissions requirement, a welcome development for equity and inclusion in the field. How can your school be next?"

     

  • Workshop

    Managing Mentoring Relationships Curricula and Training: Mentoring Up

    CIMER Project
    Details
    CIMER Logo w/Text

    Mentoring Up is an active learning approach designed for post-doctoral scholars and junior faculty to support development of the skills needed to successfully navigate the research training environment and proactively manage their mentoring relationships. The curricula integrate topics from Entering Research and Entering Mentoring to develop mentoring up skills. These curricula were originally developed for use with trainees across the science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) disciplines.

    Themes and Concepts

    • Building Research Self-Efficacy
    • Aligning Expectations
    • Maintaining Effective Communication
    • Addressing Equity and Inclusion
    • Enhancing Work-Life Integration*
    • Fostering Independence
    • Promoting Professional Development

    *Unique to Junior Faculty Curriculum

     

  • Workshop

    Mentee Curricula and Training: Entering Research

    CIMER Project
    Details
    Entering Research Book cover

    CIMER Project mentee training materials are designed for those who wish to implement process-based, professional development workshops, courses, or programs for undergraduate and graduate research trainees. The materials are designed to be used as part of a learning community, where trainees share and learn from one another.  Request mentee training at your institution or organization

     

     

  • Guide

    APS Bridge Program Key Components

    American Physical Society
    Details
    APS Bridge Program Logo

    Successful bridge programs share certain key components and exist within a supportive institutional context. These contextual and programmatic components build on one another to provide students with a complete educational experience, from admissions and induction to research and mentoring.

     

    The APS Bridge Program Resources webpage lists effective practices for inducting new students into graduate programs, as identified and described by APS Bridge Sites. It also includes specific strategies for developing a solid foundation for students before and well after their arrival on campus.

     

     

  • Workshop

    Mentor Curricula and Training: Entering Mentoring

    CIMER Project
    Details
    Entering Mentoring Book cover

    Research mentor training is an evidence-based, interactive approach designed to help mentors develop skills for engaging in productive, culturally responsive, research mentoring relationships—relationships that optimize the success of both mentors and mentees. Request mentor training at your institution or organization

     

  • Workshop

    Getting Ready For Advanced Degrees (GRAD) Lab

    The National GEM Consortium
    Details
    GEM Grad Lab

    The National GEM Consortium’s, GRAD Lab offers underrepresented students exposure to the benefits of research and technology careers in a highly interactive one-day event.

    Speakers may range from current graduate students to senior managers to faculty and senior administrators. They are selected from diverse communities and disciplines to present on the following topics:

    • “Why Graduate School”
    • “How to Prepare for Graduate School”
    • “Understanding the GEM Fellowship”, and
    • “Voices From the Field: Real Life Research and Internship Experiences”

    GRAD Lab encourages young people of color to consider graduate engineering or science education and applying for the GEM fellowship. Focusing on the global importance of research and innovation, life-long career benefits, and real world role models the symposium will help each student envision his or her future as a technology leader, successfully apply for a GEM fellowship, and gain entry to a graduate program. GRAD Lab is GEM’s portable and scalable solution for developing diverse technical talent with advanced degrees.

     

  • Website

    Pathways To Science Resource Toolbox

    Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP)
    Details
    Pathways to Science Toolbox-Hammer

    The Pathways to Science Resource Toolbox has many resources to support students as they prepare for and apply to graduate school.  Students will find great suggestions for preparing their applications and faculty & staff will resources to help them be better support their students.

     

  • Website

    myIDP: Individual Development Plan

    American Association for the Advancement of Science
    Details
    myIDP Logo

    The Individual Development Plan (IDP) concept is commonly used in industry to help employees define and pursue their career goals. 

    myIDP provides:

    • Exercises to help you examine your skills, interests, and values
    • A list of 20 scientific career paths with a prediction of which ones best fit your skills and interests
    • A tool for setting strategic goals for the coming year, with optional reminders to keep you on track
    • Articles and resources to guide you through the process

    To learn more about the value of IDPs for scientists, read the first article in our myIDP series.

     

  • Website

    Planning for Graduate Work

    American Chemical Society
    Details
    ACS Planning for Graduate Work Banner

    Successfully preparing for, finding, and transitioning into a graduate program requires an investment of time and effort. Central to this process is the on-going consideration of your goals, strengths, and opportunities. The contacts in your network will also provide information, advice, and support. Remember that great resources for learning about graduate school are undergraduate advisers, graduate faculty, and graduate school events held as part of undergraduate programming at ACS meetings.

  • Guide

    Graduate School Reality Check

    American Chemical Society
    Details
    Graduate School Reality Check Guide Cover Published in Graduate School Reality Check Second Edition,

    If you’re considering graduate school, there is a lot you can do to ensure your success... and it’s never too early to start. Most important is completing a rigorous undergraduate curriculum, such as one that meets the requirements of an ACS-certified degree. Since chemistry research is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary, taking electives in other scientific areas of interest can be good preparation for interdisciplinary graduate work.

     

  • Workshop

    Fostering Well-being

    IGEN Inclusive Practices and Research Hub
    Details
    Inclusive Practice Hub - Research | Practice Published in Equity in Graduate Education Workshops,

    Research has shown that students struggle with mental health issues such as anxiety and depression at higher rates than the general population. While some stress and uncertainty is unavoidable in training, research mentors can have a direct impact on the well-being of members of their research group. By recognizing how usual norms and practices in the academy create environments that can undermine wellbeing, particularly for minoritized students, we can become more thoughtful about the impact of our own behavior in as mentors-- and begin to foster research and learning environments that support well-being. This workshop will also encourage discussion about how mentoring can positively and negatively impact mentees’ sense of autonomy, competence, personal growth, and belonging. Developing the skills to have open conversations about the often stigmatized topics of mental health well-being is key to this process.

  • Workshop

    Strategies for Equity-based Holistic Review

    IGEN Inclusive Practices and Research Hub
    Details
    Inclusive Practice Hub - Research | Practice Published in Equity in Graduate Education Workshops ,

    Building upon prerequisite knowledge from the Fundamentals workshop this session on Strategies for Equity-based Holistic Review is a hands-on workshop for graduate admissions committee members and department leaders. Committees will articulate and assess their current admissions and recruitment practices, learn how to develop an evaluation rubric that they can put to use, and engage in discussions that will help them anticipate common challenges that may arise in shifting admissions practices. We will make additional resources and research available.

  • Workshop

    Fundamentals: Equity in Graduate Admissions

    IGEN Inclusive Practices and Research Hub
    Details
    Inclusive Practice Hub - Research | Practice Published in Equity in Graduate Education Workshops,

    This workshop presents data and research about the role of typical admissions criteria and practices in maintaining racial/ethnic inequalities in graduate education. Suitable for a wide variety of audiences, practical strategies for rethinking typical admissions criteria and processes are introduced, with a focus on equity-based holistic review and embedding attention to equity throughout the admissions and recruitment process. All aspects of this session are rooted in current research. Participants will learn how common admissions mindsets & practices tend to inhibit access for underrepresented groups, and they will be introduced to strategies to improve diversity & equity through holistic review processes.

  • Book

    Equity in Science: Representation, Culture, and the Dynamics of Change in Graduate Education

    Julie R. Posselt
    Details
    Equity In Science Published in Stanford University Press, 2020-09

    STEM disciplines are believed to be founded on the idea of meritocracy; recognition earned by the value of the data, which is objective. Such disciplinary cultures resist concerns about implicit or structural biases, and yet, year after year, scientists observe persistent gender and racial inequalities in their labs, departments, and programs. In Equity in Science, Julie Posselt makes the case that understanding how field-specific cultures develop is a crucial step for bringing about real change. She does this by examining existing equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts across astronomy, physics, chemistry, geology, and psychology. These ethnographic case studies reveal the subtle ways that exclusion and power operate in scientific organizations and, sometimes, within change efforts themselves. Posselt argues that accelerating the movement for inclusion in science requires more effective collaboration across boundaries that typically separate people and scholars—across the social and natural sciences, across the faculty-student-administrator roles, and across race, gender, and other social identities. Ultimately this book is a call for academia to place equal value on expertise, and on those who do the work of cultural translation. Posselt closes with targeted recommendations for individuals, departments, and disciplinary societies for creating systemic, sustainable change.

     

  • Newsletter

    IGEN Quarterly Update – Fall 2018

    IGEN
    Details
    IGEN Published in IGEN Newsletters, 2019-05

    Our IGEN Project Quarterly Report highlights the work being done by our alliance members and partners.

    Featured in this issue:

    • The Vision and Goals of NSF Includes: IGEN
    • Building the IGEN Community (Goal 4)
    • Catalyzing the Adoption of Inclusive Practices (Goal 2)
    • Conducting Research and Propagating Results (Goal 3)
    • Increasing Participation of UREM Students (Goal 1)
    • IGEN Project Summary

     

     

  • Newsletter

    IGEN Quarterly Update – Winter 2019

    IGEN
    Details
    IGEN Published in IGEN Newsletters, 2019-03

    Our IGEN Project Quarterly Report highlights the work being done by our alliance members and partners.

    Featured in this issue:

    • Building the IGEN Community (Goal 4)
    • Catalyzing the Adoption of Inclusive Practices (Goal 2)
    • Conducting Research and Propagating Results (Goal 3)
    • Increasing Participation of UREM Students (Goal 1)
    • IGEN Project Summary
    • Avenues for Collaboration between IGEN and Aspire

     

  • Newsletter

    IGEN Quarterly Update – Spring 2019

    IGEN
    Details
    IGEN Published in IGEN Newsletters, 2019-06

    Our IGEN Project Quarterly Report highlights the work being done by our alliance members and partners.  

     

    Featured in this issue:

    • Building the IGEN Community (Goal 4)
    • Catalyzing the Adoption of Inclusive Practices (Goal 2)
    • Conducting Research and Propagating Results (Goal 3)
    • Increasing Participation of UREM Students (Goal 1)
    • IGEN Project Summary

     

  • Article

    Posselt Helps Chart the Future of Equity in Astronomy on NASEM Committee

    PulliasAdmin
    Details
    USC Rossier Pullias Center for Higher Education Published in Pullias News , 2020-03

    The Pullias Center’s Julie Posselt serves as a member of The National Academies of Science "Panel on the State of the Profession and Societal Impacts" in Astronomy and Astrophysics that generate a comprehensive strategy and vision for the next decade of science in astronomy and astrophysics. 

     

  • Article

    Posselt and Team Author Chapter on Evaluation and Decision-Making in Higher Education

    PulliasAdmin
    Details
    USC Rossier Pullias Center for Higher Education Published in Pullias News - Pullias Center for Higher Education, 2020-03

    What are the hidden rules and practices that affect who gets respect and opportunities in higher education? How can we reconstruct these rules to encourage equity in the system? A new chapter in the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series by Julie Posselt and a team at the Pullias Center takes a hard look at these fundamental questions and suggests how evaluation and decision making can be leveraged for equity.

     

  • Article

    Pullias Team Addresses Biases and Discrimination Hiding in Letters of Recommendation

    PulliasAdmin
    Details
    USC Rossier Pullias Center for Higher Education Published in Pullias News, 2020-03

    The Pullias Center’s Julie Posselt, Steve Desir, and Román Liera are leading an effort to shine a light on this typically unrecognized source of bias that has the power to shape the careers of graduates and other applicants looking to enter or advance in the workforce. Letters of recommendation are used in admissions and hiring to glean information and qualities which may go unnoticed in the review of an applicant’s file. However, they are also one of the most common places that bias is written into applicant records– sometimes in subtle ways. 

     

     

  • Newsletter

    IGEN News Fall 2019

    IGEN
    Details
    IGEN News Published in IGEN Newsletters, 2019-11

    Our IGEN Project Quarterly Newsletter highlights the work being done by our alliance members and partners.

    Featured in this issue:

    • A preview to the 2019 IGEN National Meeting
    • Growing Academic Partnerships!
    • Research & Inclusive Practices

     

     

  • Newsletter

    IGEN News Summer 2020

    IGEN
    Details
    IGEN News Published in IGEN Newsletters, 2020-06

    Our IGEN Project Quarterly Newsletter highlights the work being done by our alliance members and partners.

    Featured in this issue:

    • New Professional Networking Group
    • Workshops and Resources for Equity in Graduate Admissions
    • Disciplinary Partner Updates

     

     

  • Website

    Equity in Graduate Education Curated Library

    IGEN Inclusive Practices and Research Hub
    Details
    Inclusive Practice Hub - Research | Practice

    Selected research curated to foster learning and adoption of inclusive practices in graduate education.

  • Workshop

    Equity in Graduate Education Virtual Journal Club

    IGEN Inclusive Practices and Research Hub
    Details
    Inclusive Practice Hub - Research | Practice

    These quarterly gatherings break down research studies and social theories that are relevant to equity in graduate education, with attention to practical implications.  

     

  • Workshop

    Facilitator Training for Admissions Workshops

    IGEN Inclusive Practices and Research Hub
    Details
    Inclusive Practice Hub - Research | Practice

    OVERVIEW & GOALS

    • Preparing higher education change agents to facilitate interactive workshops on holistic graduate admissions.
    • Faculty and administrators with an interest in improving graduate education in STEM, and without competing financial interests, are welcome to apply.
    • Preference will be given to applicants who are faculty in the physical or social sciences and who have with demonstrated effort increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion in doctoral education.

     

  • Website

    ChemIDP: ACS's Career Planning Tool

    American Chemical Society
    Details
    ChemIDP

    ChemIDP is an Individual Development Plan designed specifically for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in the chemical sciences. Through immersive, self-paced activities, users explore potential careers, determine specific skills needed for success, and develop plans to achieve professional goals. ChemIDP tracks user progress and input, providing tips and strategies to complete goals and guide career exploration.

  • Workshop

    Learn to Implement Mentor Training

    CIMER Project
    Details
    CIMER Logo w/Text

    The Facilitator Workshop: Learn to Implement Mentor Training is a two-day workshop designed to increase the capacity for research mentor trainings offered at colleges and universities, research institutes, and organizations.

    During this workshop, participants are introduced to the Entering Mentoring curricula, which addresses the following themes: aligning expectations, addressing equity and inclusion, articulating your mentoring philosophy and plan, assessing understanding, cultivating ethical behavior, enhancing work-life integration, fostering independence, maintaining effective communication, and promoting professional development. Workshop participants become familiar with the curricula, practice facilitating training components, and develop a plan for implementing the training at their institution or organization.

  • Presentation Materials

    Creating our Future: Attracting and Retaining the Best Students from all Backgrounds

    Theodore Hodapp
    Details
    U of M _ LSA Physics Department Presented at
    U. Michigan Physics Department Colloquium
    , 2020-01

    Presentation on how Physical Sciences Bridge Programs affected the participation rates of Underrepresented Minority (URM) in graduate degree programs.

     

  • Presentation Materials

    APS Bridge Program: Changing the Face of Physics / IGEN: Bridge Program – TNG

    Theodore Hodapp
    Details
    Presented at
    Inclusion Matters: Unpacking Bias, Building Inclusion
    , 2019-04

    Biases, conscious or unconscious, are learned social stereotypes that have real effects in the workplace. This series explores individual, organizational and societal factors that influence the intersection of diversity, equity and inclusion. Participants will be challenged to examine their actions and inactions. This series is designed to provide practical tools and resources that interrupt bias and promote workplace inclusion.

  • Presentation Materials

    Broadening Participation in Graduate Education Through Holistic Review

    Casey Miller, Julie Posselt
    Details
    Presented at
    APS-Bridge Program and National Mentoring Community Conference
    , 2018-11

    Presentation on the results of NSF-funded research on holistic review as one strategy for broadening who has access to STEM graduate education.  How to facilitate conversations about how STEM faculty can catalyze institutional change, and how structuring holistic review using evaluation rubrics may be part of those efforts.

  • Presentation Materials

    Mental Health in Graduate Education: What Faculty, Friends, and Family Can Do

    Julie R. Posselt
    Details
    Presented at
    APS-Bridge Program and National Mentoring Community Conference
    , 2018-11

    Stories and statistics abound about the struggles of graduate education and the risks for wellbeing that it poses to students. In this plenary, we’ll explore both root causes of mental illness among today’s generation of graduate students, the unique barriers experienced by members of minoritized communities, as well as the proactive steps that faculty, friends, and family can take to provide support and challenge toxic norms within academia. Posselt will present research completed through a two year National Academy of Education fellowship on graduate student mental health, sharing findings from two studies: 1) A large-scale national analysis of 20,000 students’ views on competition, discrimination, and support in relation to depression and anxiety, and 2) A qualitative study of the ways that doctoral students of color within STEM conceptualize faculty support.

  • Blog Post

    To GRE or not to GRE: FAQ

    Jane Willenbring
    Details
    Published in Speaking of Geoscience, 2020-07

    Frequently asked questions regarding GRE and Graduate Admissions Like you, I’ve struggled with what to use for graduate admission criteria in the Geosciences. A little over a year ago, I intended to write about why we should use the GRE for admissions, but the more I read, the more I decided it was a flawed measure. Since writing my post, To GRE or not to GRE, I’ve received several questions that I’d like to respond to here, publicly. Given that COVID -19 has drastically changed testing, I also discuss that.

  • Article

    Genentech Foundation provides $3 million grant to ACS Bridge Project

    Staff Writer
    Details
    Published in American Chemical Society, 2020-03

    The Genentech Foundation has provided support to the ACS Bridge Program.

  • Article

    AGU’s Bridge Program Creates Opportunities for Underrepresented Students

    Chris McEntee
    Details
    Published in Eos, 2019-12

    In its first year, 20% of the 250 active Earth and space science graduate programs in the United States applied for partnership with the program.

     

  • Article

    ACS Bridge Project: A game changer for the chemical enterprise

    Quinn Gray Teri
    Details
    Published in Chemical & Engineering News, 2019-08

    Underrepresented minority students make up a third of college-age US citizens and earn roughly 18% of US chemistry bachelor’s degrees and 11% of chemistry PhDs, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics’ Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System.

  • Article

    Why meritocracy is a myth in college admissions

    Jerome A. Lucido, Julie R. Posselt, Morgan Polikoff
    Details
    Published in The Conversation, 2019-03

    Even if wealthy parents don't resort to the kind of illegal tactics in the recent college cheating scandal revealed by the FBI, the college admission process still favors the rich, scholars argue.

  • Article

    To GRE or not to GRE

    Jane Willenbring
    Details
    Published in Geological Society of America, 2019-01

    ...The data shows that the GRE gives us no predictive information on who will succeed in graduate school (even among men) and simultaneously acts to weed out people of color and underrepresented minorities and, as a whole, doesn’t help women applicants either.

    © 2019 SPEAKING OF GEOSCIENCE

  • Article

    AGU Joins Partnership to Build Greater Diversity and Inclusion in the Physical Sciences

    Chris McEntee
    Details
    Published in From the Prow, 2018-09

    ...AGU is one of five scientific societies that have formed the Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN), which will increase the participation of women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities in graduate studies in the physical sciences. 

  • Book

    Higher Education Administration for Social Justice and Equity - Critical Perspectives for Leadership

    Adrianna Kezar and Julie Posselt
    Details

    Abstract

    Higher Education Administration for Social Justice and Equity empowers all administrators in higher education to engage in their work—to make decisions, hire, mentor, budget, create plans, and carry out other day-to-day operations—with a clear commitment to justice, sensitivity to power and privilege, and capacity to facilitate equitable outcomes. Grounding administration for social justice as a matter of daily work, this book translates abstract concepts and theory into the work of hiring, socialization, budgeting, and decision-making. Contributed chapters by renowned scholars and current practitioners examine the way higher education administration is organized, and will help readers both question existing structures and practices, and consider new and different ways of organizing campuses based on equity and social justice. Rich with case studies and pedagogical tools, this book connects theory to practice, and is an invaluable resource for current and aspiring administrators.